Tabletop Weatherglass

Tabletop Weatherglass

An early glass barometer, dating back to the 17th century, is one of the few antique scientific instruments still popular today. The handblown glass accurately forecasts weather hours in advance. Fill with colored water and check the weather by looking at the level of the liquid in the spout. A high water level in the spout indicates a low pressure area: approaching storm. A low level indicated high pressure: nice, fair weather. Comes with a brass dropcatcher to catch fall-out of extremely heavy weather fronts, such as severe thunderstorms. The water bottle hangs from a beautiful brass and wood stand that will create a conversation in any room. Size: 12 1/2" high and 6" diameter.


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Expedition Weather Radio

Expedition Weather Radio

In emergency situations, up to the minute information is crucial for protecting yourself and your family. This new weather radio from Oregon Scientific broadcasts local weather forecasts, weather related travel conditions and warnings about impending severe weather. The radio also receives broadcasts from the US Emergency Alert System, which provides national and local information regarding public health and safety issues, such as earthquakes, toxic chemical spills, radiation emergencies, explosions and fires. The radio features automatic alert activations using SAME (Specific Area Message Encoding) technology. This allows you to enter a specific county or area within your county to receive only the alerts that apply to your immediate area via an audible or visual alarm. It digitally scans all seven NOAA weather radio channels, and has a user selectable 12 or 24 hour clock with alarm and eight minute snooze. Uses 3 AAA batteries (not included).


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